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Updated: 10 weeks 6 days ago

Convict marks 50 days on the run by taunting police

Tue, 2017-08-08 08:47
A fugitive who escaped from an Indonesian jail has celebrated his 50 days on the run by taunting police on Facebook.

Born this way? Researchers explore the science of gender identity

Tue, 2017-08-08 08:25

By Daniel Trotta

While President Donald Trump has thrust transgender people back into the conflict between conservative and liberal values in the United States, geneticists are quietly working on a major research effort to unlock the secrets of gender identity.

A consortium of five research institutions in Europe and the United States, including Vanderbilt University Medical Center, George Washington University and Boston Children’s Hospital, is looking to the genome, a person’s complete set of DNA, for clues about whether transgender people are born that way.

Two decades of brain research have provided hints of a biological origin to being transgender, but no irrefutable conclusions.

Now scientists in the consortium have embarked on what they call the largest-ever study of its kind, searching for a genetic component to explain why people assigned one gender at birth so persistently identify as the other, often from very early childhood.

Researchers have extracted DNA from the blood samples of 10,000 people, 3,000 of them transgender and the rest non-transgender, or cisgender. The project is awaiting grant funding to begin the next phase: testing about 3 million markers, or variations, across the genome for all of the samples.

Knowing what variations transgender people have in common, and comparing those patterns to those of cisgender people in the study, may help investigators understand what role the genome plays in everyone’s gender identity.

“If the trait is strongly genetic, then people who identify as trans will share more of their genome, not because they are related in nuclear families but because they are more anciently related,” said Lea Davis, leader of the study and an assistant professor of medicine at the Vanderbilt Genetics Institute.

The search for the biological underpinnings is taking on new relevance as the battle for transgender rights plays out in the U.S. political arena.

One of the first acts of the new Trump administration was to revoke Obama-era guidelines directing public schools to allow transgender students to use bathrooms of their choice. Last week, the president announced on Twitter he intends to ban transgender people from serving in the military.

A gender-neutral bathroom is seen at the University of California

Texas lawmakers are debating a bathroom bill that would require people to use the bathroom of the sex listed on their birth certificate. North Carolina in March repealed a similar law after a national boycott cost the state hundreds of millions of dollars in lost business.

Currently, the only way to determine whether people are transgender is for them to self-identify as such. While civil rights activists contend that should be sufficient, scientists have taken their search to the lab.

That quest has made some transgender people nervous. If a “cause” is found it could posit a “cure,” potentially opening the door to so-called reparative therapies similar to those that attempt to turn gay people straight, advocates say. Others raise concerns about the rights of those who may identify as trans but lack biological “proof.”

Davis stressed that her study does not seek to produce a genetic test for being transgender, nor would it be able to. Instead, she said, she hopes the data will lead to better care for transgender people, who experience wide health disparities compared to the general population.

One-third of transgender people reported a negative healthcare experience in the previous year such as verbal harassment, refusal of treatment or the need to teach their doctors about transgender care, according to a landmark survey of nearly 28,000 people released last year by the National Center for Transgender Equality.

Some 40 percent have attempted suicide, almost nine times the rate for the general population.

“We can use this information to help train doctors and nurses to provide better care to trans patients and to also develop amicus briefs to support equal rights legislation,” said Davis, who is also director of research for Vanderbilt’s gender health clinic.

The Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Tennessee has one of the world’s largest DNA databanks. It also has emerged as a leader in transgender healthcare with initiatives such as the Trans Buddy Program, which pairs every transgender patient with a volunteer to help guide them through their healthcare visits.

The study has applied for a grant from the National Institutes of Health and is exploring other financial sources to provide the $1 million needed to complete the genotyping, expected to take a year to 18 months. Analysis of the data would take about another six months and require more funding, Davis said.

The other consortium members are Vrije University in Amsterdam and the FIMABIS institute in Malaga, Spain.

PROBING THE BRAIN

Until now, the bulk of research into the origins of being transgender has looked at the brain.

Neurologists have spotted clues in the brain structure and activity of transgender people that distinguish them from cisgender subjects.

A seminal 1995 study was led by Dutch neurobiologist Dick Swaab, who was also among the first scientists to discover structural differences between male and female brains. Looking at postmortem brain tissue of transgender subjects, he found that male-to-female transsexuals had clusters of cells, or nuclei, that more closely resembled those of a typical female brain, and vice versa.

Swaab’s body of work on postmortem samples was based on just 12 transgender brains that he spent 25 years collecting. But it gave rise to a whole new field of inquiry that today is being explored with advanced brain scan technology on living transgender volunteers.

Among the leaders in brain scan research is Ivanka Savic, a professor of neurology with Sweden’s Karolinska Institute and visiting professor at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Her studies suggest that transgender men have a weakened connection between the two areas of the brain that process the perception of self and one’s own body. Savic said those connections seem to improve after the person receives cross-hormone treatment.

Her work has been published more than 100 times on various topics in peer-reviewed journals, but she still cannot conclude whether people are born transgender.

“I think that, but I have to prove that,” Savic said.

A number of other researchers, including both geneticists and neurologists, presume a biological component that is also influenced by upbringing.

But Paul McHugh, a university professor of psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, has emerged as the leading voice challenging the “born-this-way” hypothesis.

He encourages psychiatric therapy for transgender people, especially children, so that they accept the gender assigned to them at birth.

McHugh has gained a following among social conservatives, while incensing LGBT advocates with comments such as calling transgender people “counterfeit.”

Last year he co-authored a review of the scientific literature published in The New Atlantis journal, asserting there was scant evidence to suggest sexual orientation and gender identity were biologically determined.

The article drew a rebuke from nearly 600 academics and clinicians who called it misleading.

McHugh told Reuters he was “unmoved” by his critics and says he doubts additional research will reveal a biological cause.

“If it were obvious,” he said, “they would have found it long ago.”

The post Born this way? Researchers explore the science of gender identity appeared first on Cyprus Mail.

Chantek, ‘the ape who went to college,’ dies at 39

Tue, 2017-08-08 08:17

Chantek, a male orangutan who was among the first apes to learn sign language, could clean his room and memorized the way to a fast-food restaurant, died on Monday at age 39, Zoo Atlanta said.

Chantek, who was taught by a trainer who raised him like her own child, was being treated for heart disease, the zoo said in a statement. A necropsy will determine the cause of death.

“Chantek will be deeply missed by his family here at Zoo Atlanta. He had such a unique and engaging personality and special ways of relating to and communicating with those who knew him best,” said Hayley Murphy, vice president of the zoo’s animal divisions.

Chantek, one of the oldest male orangutans in North American zoos, was born at the Yerkes Regional Primate Research Center in Atlanta. He was sent to live with anthropologist Lyn Miles at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga for about nine years.

Chantek learned to clean his room, make and use tools and could direct a driving route from the university to a Dairy Queen restaurant, according to a 2014 PBS documentary, “The Ape Who Went to College.”

Chantek was among a handful of primates who could communicate using American Sign Language, along with Koko, a gorilla, and Washoe, a female chimpanzee.

He was transferred to Zoo Atlanta in 1997 and frequently used sign language to communicate with keepers, the zoo said. But he was shy about signing with people he did not know and often used communication more typical of orangutans, such as vocalizations and hand gestures, it said.

Zoo Atlanta began a medical regimen in 2016 to treat Chantek’s symptoms of heart disease. Cardiac disease is a leading cause of death among great apes such as orangutans in zoos.

Chantek was put on a low-sodium diet, and he was the first awake orangutan to undergo a voluntary echocardiogram to examine his heart’s electrical rhythms.

Both Bornean and Sumatran species of orangutans are listed as critically endangered in the wild. The two species are facing sharp drops in numbers because of habitat loss, timber cutting and human encroachment, the zoo said.

The post Chantek, ‘the ape who went to college,’ dies at 39 appeared first on Cyprus Mail.

‘Mr Silk’ McLeod brings joy to Jamaica on Independence Day

Tue, 2017-08-08 08:14

As Usain Bolt takes his leave of athletics and the desperate hunt grows to find charismatic new trailblazers for the sport, another young Jamaican, Omar McLeod, demonstrated in winning the 110 metres hurdles title on Monday why he may fit the bill.

He’s young, cool, bright, very fast and likes to style himself as “Mr Silk” with the smooth hurdling technique.

After a weekend where it was all doom and gloom back home after the 100 metres losses of Bolt and Elaine Thompson, 23-year-old Mcleod chose the perfect night to bound headlong to world championship glory and cheer his nation.

“Happy Independence Day, Jamaica! I love you guys!” he declared with a laugh, recognising that everyone was watching him on the island’s public holiday as he became the first man since American Allen Johnson in 1997 to pull off the Olympics/World Championships 110m hurdles double in successive years.

“I’m elated, completely overcome with emotion and I especially wanted to dedicate this win to Usain. I felt it was up to me out there to bring the boost back to Jamaica and I think I’ve done that.”

Yet while he saluted his peerless hero Bolt, who was only able to win bronze in his final individual 100m, he also looked and sounded every inch the sort of talismanic figure who could ensure swiftly that Jamaica has a new male superstar to savour.

For after comfortably defeating what he considered the best 110m hurdles field in history in 13.04 seconds, the U.S.-based speedster made it clear that he felt this was just the beginning of something even more spectacular.

NEW WORLDS

Nobody is suggesting that Bolt is anything but irreplaceable but here is an athlete who actually has strings to his bow that even the great Usain never had.

For not only is he already the only man ever to have run under 10 seconds for 100 metres and under 13 seconds for the 110m hurdles, he can also spread his talent across events as varied as the 400m hurdles and the 200m.

Next year, he declared after his victory, would be the time to see him spread his wings.

“I’ve got new worlds to conquer now,” he beamed. “I really, really want that world record now so we’ll see what happens next.”

The man who holds the 12.80 seconds mark that he is after, American Aries Merritt, could only finish fifth in the final and the future of the event now lies in McLeod’s quicksilver feet.

He is the only top high hurdler still taking eight steps to reach the first hurdle and, though he was planning to move down to seven this season, he put that plan back to next year to ensure he did not mess with his world championships ambitions.

Next year, though, he will definitely experiment.

“It was probably the best line up in history tonight. I knew in order to win I had to do it the Omar McLeod way,” he said.

“I had to bring my own spark back. I had to get out and take control of the race. And just go out and have fun. And I did that.”

There was, he said, a special reason to deliver. “My mum is here, so I had to do it for her,” he said, after having given her a big hug at trackside. McLeod looks to be a breath of fresh air for the sport.

The post ‘Mr Silk’ McLeod brings joy to Jamaica on Independence Day appeared first on Cyprus Mail.

Barca chief Bartomeu criticises disloyal Neymar

Tue, 2017-08-08 08:09

Barcelona president Josep Maria Bartomeu hit out at Neymar’s lack of loyalty to the club on Monday and criticised the Brazilian for staying silent up until his world record 222 million euro move to Paris St. Germain.

The speculation about Neymar’s eventual move to France overshadowed the club’s pre-season tour of the United States in July and, while his teammates were inundated with questions about the player, the forward made no comment on his future until the move was confirmed last Thursday.

“His way of doing things was not the best, it was not the behaviour we expect of one of our players,” Bartomeu said at Barca’s annual supporters’ congress on Monday.

“We were always clear and we would have liked a bit more clarity from him. Values are very important to us and players need to feel like they are at the best club in the world.”

Bartomeu said the club was now ready for life without Neymar, who scored 105 goals in four seasons with Barca and won two Liga titles, three King’s Cups and the 2015 Champions League.

He contrasted the Brazilian’s fleeting loyalty with one-club-men Lionel Messi and Andres Iniesta.

“No player is above Barca, everything has a limit and that is why we did what we did. Messi’s loyalty should be an example for everyone who wants to wear our colours, as should Iniesta’s,” said Bartomeu.

The Barca chief said the club had suspected Neymar might leave one day when he agreed a new contract in 2016.

“We predicted Neymar could leave so we raised his buy-out clause to 222 million so we would have a stable future. When we started to doubt he would stay, we remained calm because whatever happened would have been good for Barca,” he said.

“If he’d stayed we would have kept an exceptional player, and if he went we’d be able to guarantee we could sign other players.”

Bartomeu added that the team would move away from its recent axis of Messi, Neymar and Luis Suarez, the most prolific front three of all time, to focus on building a stronger team overall.

“Now we won’t be talking about the Barca of the trident, we’ll be focusing more on the team,” he said.

The post Barca chief Bartomeu criticises disloyal Neymar appeared first on Cyprus Mail.

Sinead O’Connor’s video has sparked fear

Tue, 2017-08-08 08:05

The 50-year-old singer broke down in tears in an emotional video shared on her Facebook page in which the star told fans she is living in a motel in “the a**e end of New Jersey”, and insisted her life is “revolving around just not dying”.

In the 12-minute clip, which she captioned “#OneOfMillions”, she said: “I am now living in a Travelodge motel in the a**e end of New Jersey, I’ve got a f***ing kidney stone.

“I’m all by myself. And there’s absolutely nobody in my life except my doctor, my psychiatrist – the sweetest man on earth, who says I’m his hero – and that’s about the only f***ing thing keeping me alive at the moment … and that’s kind of pathetic.

“I want everyone to know what it’s like, that’s why I’m making this video.

“Mental illness, it’s like drugs, it doesn’t give a s**t who you are, and equally what’s worse, it’s the stigma, it doesn’t give a s**t who you are.

“Suddenly all the people who are supposed to be loving you and taking care of you are treating you like s**t. It’s like a witch hunt.

“Three f***ing illnesses made me suicidal … my whole life is revolving around just not dying.

“And I’m not going to die, I’m not going to die but still this is no way for people to be living.”

The ‘Nothing Compares 2 U’ hitmaker admitted she has been lonely for two years “as a punishment for being mentally ill”.

She added: “I’m not doing this for me. I’m staying alive for the people that are doing this to me. If it was me, I’d be gone.

“If it was just for me I’d be gone. Straight away back to my mum …because I’ve walked this earth alone for two years now as punishment for being mentally f**king ill and getting angry that no one would f***ing take care of me.

“I’m a 5’4′ little f***ing woman wandering the world for two years by myself.”

A message later appeared on her Facebook page written by someone else which stated Sinead is “safe” and “not suicidal”.

It read: “Hi everybody, I am posting at Sinead’s request, to let everyone who loves her know she is safe, and she is not suicidal. She is surrounded by love and receiving the best of care. She asked for this to be posted knowing you are concerned for her. I won’t respond to any questions, so please understand. I hope this comforts those of you were concerned.”

In May, Sinead issued an apology to her family for insulting them during her breakdown in 2016.

She said: “Last year I did something … unforgivable because I was out of my mind.”

In 2016, the singer – who was diagnosed with bipolar disorder more than a decade ago – revealed a successful stint in rehab helped her kick an addiction to marijuana.

Earlier this year, US TV star Arsenio Hall dropped a $5 million lawsuit against Sinead in relation to a Facebook post in which she claimed he gave Prince drugs.

Sinead – who has four children from different relationships – revealed on Facebook in 2015 she had taken an overdose at a hotel in Ireland but she was later found safe.

The post Sinead O’Connor’s video has sparked fear appeared first on Cyprus Mail.

Google sacks man over 'harmful' gender memo

Tue, 2017-08-08 07:59
Google has fired the man behind an internal memo which railed against political correctness at the company.

Old friends make the best jazz

Tue, 2017-08-08 07:31

Jazz is on the up and up right now all over the island, but Limassol will take the lead in this music frenzy on Wednesday when saxophonist and clarinettist Giorgos Krasidis and double bassist Irenaeos Koulouras will take to the Bistrot 55 stage.

These two influential jazz instrumentalists have performed together countless times in Cyprus, Europe and America. They studied together in America in the 1990s at the Berklee College of Music in Boston, where they began their collaboration. Things haven’t changed much some 20-years down the line – other than musical experience – as the two still continue to work together and with world-renowned musicians.

Irenaeos Koulouras and Giorgos Krasidis are considered to be among the pioneers and most important soloists and educators of jazz music on the island, so if you are a jazz fan and haven’t had the pleasure yet, prepare to be musically amazed.

Jazz Set
Music by Giorgos Krasidis and Irenaeos Koulouras. August 9. Bistrot 55, 55 Eleftherias Street, Limassol. 9pm. Tel: 25-212100

The post Old friends make the best jazz appeared first on Cyprus Mail.

Google fires employee behind anti-diversity memo

Tue, 2017-08-08 07:30

Internet giant Google has fired the male engineer at the center of an uproar in Silicon Valley over the past week after he authored an internal memo asserting there are biological causes behind gender inequality in the tech industry.

James Damore, the engineer who wrote the memo, confirmed his dismissal, saying in an email to Reuters on Monday that he had been fired for “perpetuating gender stereotypes”.

Damore said he was exploring all possible legal remedies, and that before being fired, he had submitted a charge to the U.S. National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) accusing Google upper management of trying to shame him into silence.

“It’s illegal to retaliate against an NLRB charge,” he wrote in the email.

Google, a unit of Alphabet Inc based in Mountain View, Calif., said it could not talk about individual employee cases.

Google Chief Executive Sundar Pichai told employees in a note on Monday that portions of the anti-diversity memo “violate our Code of Conduct and cross the line by advancing harmful gender stereotypes in our workplace,” according to a copy of the note seen by Reuters.

It was not immediately clear what legal authority Damore could try to invoke. Non-union or “at will” employees, such as most tech workers, can be fired in the United States for a wide array of reasons that have nothing to do with performance.

The U.S. National Labor Relations Act guarantees workers, whether they are in a union or not, the right to engage in “concerted activities” for their “mutual aid or protection”.

Damore, though, would likely face an uphill fight to seek that protection based on his memo, said Alison Morantz, a Stanford University law professor with expertise in labor law.

“It’s going to be a hard sell that this activity was either concerted or for mutual aid or protection, rather than simply venting or pitting one group of workers against the others, which does not sound very mutual,” Morantz said.

Debate over the treatment of women in the male-dominated tech industry has raged for months. Claims of persistent sexual harassment in the ranks of Uber Technologies Inc and of several venture capital firms led to management shakeups.

Management at the largest tech firms, including Google, have publicly committed to diversifying their workforces, although the percentage of women in engineering and management roles remains low at many companies.

The U.S. Department of Labor is investigating whether Google has unlawfully paid women less than men. The company has denied the charges.

Damore asserted in his 3,000-word document that circulated inside the company last week that “Google’s left bias has created a politically correct monoculture” which prevented honest discussion of diversity.

The engineer, who has a doctoral degree in systems biology from Harvard University, according to his LinkedIn page, attacked the idea that gender diversity should be a goal.

“The distribution of preferences and abilities of men and women differ in part due to biological causes and … these differences may explain why we don’t see equal representation of women in tech and leadership,” Damore wrote in the memo.

He quickly received support in conservative media outlets. On Breitbart News, once run by Steve Bannon, now chief strategist to President Donald Trump, commentators overnight discussed whether to boycott Google and switch to services such as Microsoft Corp’s Bing.

Google’s vice president of diversity, Danielle Brown, sent a memo in response to the furor over the weekend, saying the engineer’s essay “advanced incorrect assumptions about gender”.

The post Google fires employee behind anti-diversity memo appeared first on Cyprus Mail.

Jittery Kenyans vote in Odinga’s last bid for presidency

Tue, 2017-08-08 07:10

Millions of people go to the polls in Kenya on Tuesday amid fears that the latest electoral clash between its foremost political dynasties could once again descend into violence.

President Uhuru Kenyatta, 55, the businessman son of Kenya’s first president, is running for the second time against arch rival Raila Odinga, a 72-year-old former political prisoner and son of the east African nation’s first vice-president.

After two months of campaigning marked by fiery rhetoric but public speeches largely free of the ethnic hate that has sullied previous contests, opinion polls have put the pair neck-and-neck. The winner needs one vote more than 50 percent.

First results are not expected before Wednesday, but a very close race might mean as long as three days before a winner emerges. Officially, election authorities have up to a week to declare the outcome.

The razor-thin margins forecast have increased the chances of glitches – innocent or otherwise – giving grounds for the loser to complain about the result, as Odinga did in 2007 and 2013.

A decade ago, vote tallying was abruptly stopped and the incumbent president declared the winner, triggering an outcry from Odinga’s camp followed by outbreaks of ethnic violence in which 1,200 people were killed and 600,000 displaced.

International Criminal Court cases against Kenyatta and his now-deputy, William Ruto, collapsed for lack of evidence.

In 2013, electronic voting equipment suffered widespread failures, although Odinga’s decision to limit his complaints to the courts prevented any unrest.

This time – probably Odinga’s last tilt at the top job in East Africa’s biggest economy – the opposition has repeatedly accused the government of trying to rig the polls.

ETHNIC STRONGHOLDS

The torture and murder of a top election official and the deportation of two foreign Odinga advisers have fuelled wild online conspiracy theories and “fake news” items consumed voraciously by Kenya’s tech-savvy populus.

Tens of thousands have returned to their ethnic strongholds ahead of the elections, fearful of a repeat of 2007 violence.

Odinga’s key support is in the west and along the coast, with Kenyatta’s strongholds in central Kenya and the Rift Valley. Urban centres are up for grabs.

The government has deployed more than 150,000 security personnel, including wildlife rangers, to protect 41,000 polling stations.

The electoral commission insists it has run all necessary tests to safeguard the tallying and transmission of results, although a partial test laid on last week for the media had some glitches.

There are more than 6,000 domestic observers and party agents at each tallying station will have to sign off on results that are then sent electronically to county offices and a national collation centre in the capital, Nairobi.

In addition to a new president, Kenyans are electing lawmakers and local representatives, the result of a post-2007 constitutional shake-up designed to devolve power and reduce the “winner takes all” nature of the presidential race.

As a result, local races have generated unprecedented interest.

“Devolution was brought in to deal with the all-or-nothing presidential contest that we had in the past. The president could reward his home of origin and completely ignore other places,” said Murithi Mutiga, a regional analyst with the think-tank International Crisis Group.

“Now political patronage has also devolved to the counties.”

The post Jittery Kenyans vote in Odinga’s last bid for presidency appeared first on Cyprus Mail.

Tourists warned about toxic 'sea sawdust' algae

Tue, 2017-08-08 07:08
Tourists have been warned to avoid blooms of toxic microalgae that have been propagating in the hot weather off Spain's Canary Islands.

United’s Mourinho eyes first Super Cup win in Real reunion

Tue, 2017-08-08 07:00

Manchester United’s Jose Mourinho can collect the one European trophy he lacks when his side face Real Madrid in the Uefa Super Cup on Tuesday (9.45pm) in his first competitive meeting with the Spanish giants since an acrimonious split in 2013.

Mourinho, whose team won the Europa League last season to salvage an otherwise disappointing first campaign under the Portuguese, led Real to the Liga title with a record 100 points and won a King’s Cup in an eventful stay between 2010 and 2013.

His achievements at the Santiago Bernabeu were overshadowed, however, by his falling out with key dressing-room figures such as Sergio Ramos and Iker Casillas as well as confrontations with referees and opponents plus a failure to win the Champions League, as Real lost in the semi finals each year.

Mourinho’s legacy has been upstaged by the Spanish club’s three Champions League triumphs in the four years since his departure, although in a recent interview the Portuguese claimed he had “to beg” Real’s board to let him leave for Chelsea.

Champions League holders Real will probably be without talisman and former United forward Cristiano Ronaldo in Skopje, Macedonia, as the Portugal international was allowed to report late for pre-season training after he played in the Confederations Cup.

Zinedine Zidane’s side beat Sevilla 3-2 in extra-time last year to win the showcase match and the French coach is targeting a fourth European trophy in less than two years in charge of Real, which would match Mourinho’s tally of continental titles.

United, meanwhile, will be missing central defenders Eric Bailly and Phil Jones due to suspension, opening up a place in the starting line-up for new recruit Victor Lindelof.

The Swede is one of three signings made so far by United along with Belgium striker Romelu Lukaku and midfield anchorman Nemanja Matic arriving at a combined cost of £146 million as the Old Trafford side look to improve on a disappointing sixth-placed Premier League finish last term.

Real have added promising youngsters Theo Hernandez and Dani Ceballos to their talent-packed squad which won a Liga and Champions League double last season while parting ways with forwards Alvaro Morata and James Rodriguez.

Their reported interest in French teenage sensation Kylian Mbappe has yet to materialise, however.

United beat Real on penalties after a 1-1 draw in a friendly in California last month and won five of their other pre-season games, losing only to Barcelona.

Real, meanwhile, failed to win any of their four friendluies in the United States in 90 minutes, losing 3-2 to Barca and getting thrashed 4-1 by Manchester City, their only win coming in a shoot-out victory over an MLS All-Stars team.

“The sensation overall is not good, when you don’t win any of your four games something is wrong,” Zidane told reporters after the tour.
“We have to do a lot more, we’ve made a bad start with these results and what we all want is to get home, rest and think about the Super Cup.”

The post United’s Mourinho eyes first Super Cup win in Real reunion appeared first on Cyprus Mail.